Greg Capullo Designer Series Talon Review

I was never interested in action figures of DC characters, for two reasons; I love Marvel more than DC and the action figures being released of said DC characters were always straight up poopoo. Flat colors and super ugly articulation. Enter DC Collectibles; I’m not sure if it was the Arkham Origins or the Capullo Batman that first caught my eye, but both these figures definitely put DCC on the map for me. Combined with the fact that I’m a fan of the Snyder/Capullo book, it was reason enough for me to dive into this line.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic
PackagingImage and video hosting by TinyPic
Here we have another collector friendly box with a clearly displayed figure. I like the tight, simple angular design of this package, it really keeps all the focus on the figure inside.
This probably is just me, but I find the branding on the front to be strange. It says; “DC Comics Designer Series Greg Capullo Action Figure”. Sooo, this is an action figure of Greg Capullo? It would have been easily fixed by changing that into: “Greg Capullo Designer Series Talon Action figure”. But whatever.
The back of the box features the rest of the figures from this wave and it credits Jonathan Matthews with sculpting these figures. I really welcome it when companies do this. In this way they show appreciation for the sculptors and give us, the fans, some understanding in who was involved in making the toys that we love.

The figureImage and video hosting by TinyPic
The first thing that caches the eye with Talon is that there is not a lot of paint on this figure. It is mostly molded in a black plastic and only has the details painted on. Some of these details are painted very clean, like the goggles and the owl medallion on his chest. Other paint applications look rushed and sloppy. Which is really a missed opportunity since there is so little paint to go around in the first place. The daggers which are sculpted on the right gauntlet are not painted all the way through and I wish that more attention and care was put into the left gauntlet, which is sculpted to look like an owl. From a distance it looks passable, but since this figure is geared towards the collectors, you might expect more from the paint application.
Standing in a vanilla pose, Talon still sports an imposing physique. He’s not somebody you would want to see standing over your bed in the middle of the night. Even though the sculpt of this figure looks soft, with little definition, the proportions are done very well, making Talon look like he can handle himself in a fight.
There are very few sculpted wrinkles and folds to simulate cloth or leather. Except for the sculpted ornamental motif on the suit, the surface of this figure is just smooth and flat. This makes Talon balance right on the border of looking boring and allowing for that stealthy and sleek look. Some kind of texture on his suit would have been nice. I compared the figure to Capullo his artwork and I feel like there is some texture to the suit in the comics. It might look that way because of the shading. Either way, the sculptor chose to interpret the artwork the way he saw fit.

The ArticulationImage and video hosting by TinyPic
Talon is a 2014 DC Collectibles product, which means that the articulation on this figure is not amazing.  The most bothersome absentee in the articulation, is that there is zero movement of the head. You could account this to the design of the hood, but there just had to be a way to engineer some articulation in there. Another strike is the absence of ankle pivot. This figure came out during a time when ankle pivot was basically standard issue for any action figure. It’s really hard trying to put a character in some dynamic poses with no ankle pivot. Talon suffers greatly from this. All other articulation is good enough, although I would have preferred double jointed elbows and some more outward range of motion in the hips. But no head articulation, I mean come on!

AccessoriesImage and video hosting by TinyPic
Talon comes with a decent amount of extra stuff. The most unique being the Court of Owls mask. None of the figures in this line can actually wear this mask, but it makes for a really cool prop for either Talon or Batman. You can pull off some pretty bad ass poses with Batman holding this accessory. For the rest; Talon is all about blades. He has two aggressive looking swords (they look more like machetes in my opinion). Talon can hold on to these swords pretty well, and they can be stored in the X-shaped sheaths on his back. Talon also has two knives, which are bent beyond recognition in the packaging. When I got mine out of the box, they were almost folded in half. This is easily fixed with some heat, but who the hell thought that it was a good idea to package them that way? And finally Talon comes with six throwing daggers which are stored across his chest. It’s a really cool feature that these daggers are removable and Talon can be posed, holding them between thumb and index finger. All aforementioned accessories are sculpted and painted in the same fashion as the figure, which is to say that they suffer from the soft sculpt and the somewhat sloppy paint applications.

Image and video hosting by TinyPicIn closing: depending on how big of a fan you are of Greg Capullo his artwork or the Court of Owls storyline, you can decide if this figure is worth picking up. Does Talon have great articulation? No. Does the figure have an outstanding sculpt and paint applications? No. But the overall appeal and coolness of the character still make me like this figure very much. It also helps that this is the only Talon figure in an 1/12-ish scale. If you enjoy the Snyder/Cappulo Batman book, than this figure is definitely worth checking out.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic
Image and video hosting by TinyPic
Image and video hosting by TinyPic
Image and video hosting by TinyPic
Image and video hosting by TinyPic
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

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